share_book
Envoyer cet article par e-mail

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

ou partager sur :

share_comment
Partager ce commentaire par e-mail

ou partager sur :

PRÊT A ACHETER?
(vous pouvez toujours annuler plus tard)


J'aime
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

  (Auteur)


Prix : Cet article n'a pas encore de prix  ask_price

Demande de cotation sur ""
Ce titre est nouveau dans notre fonds d'ouvrages et nous ne l'avons encore jamais vendu à ce jour.
Notre engagement: Vous obtenir le meilleur prix
Aussi nombreux que soient les titres que nous référençons, absolument rien n'est automatisé dans la fixation de nos prix; et plutôt que de convertir automatiquement le prix en euros et risquer de répercuter sur vous un prix artificiellement élevé, nous vous faisons un devis rapide après avoir vérifié les prix auprès de nos différents fournisseurs.
Cette étape de demande de cotation est rapide (généralement quelques heures) et vise à vous faire bénéficier en permanence du meilleur prix pour vos achats de livres.


Sur commande

Des articles qui pourraient aussi vous intéresser

    Description de "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks"

    Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. If you could pile all HeLa cells ever grown onto a scale, they’d weigh more than 50 million metric tons—as much as a hundred Empire State Buildings. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave.Now Rebecca Skloot takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the “colored” ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers full of HeLa cells; from Henrietta’s small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia—a land of wooden slave quarters, faith healings, and voodoo—to East Baltimore today, where her children and grandchildren live and struggle with the legacy of her cells. Henrietta’s family did not learn of her “immortality” until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists investigating HeLa began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. And though the cells had launched a multimillion-dollar industry that sells human biological materials, her family never saw any of the profits. As Rebecca Skloot so brilliantly shows, the story of the Lacks family—past and present—is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of. Over the decade it took to uncover this story, Rebecca became enmeshed in the lives of the Lacks family—especially Henrietta’s daughter Deborah, who was devastated to learn about her mother’s cells. She was consumed with questions: Had scientists cloned her mother? Did it hurt her when researchers infected her cells with viruses and shot them into space? What happened to her sister, Elsie, who died in a mental institution at the age of fifteen? And if her mother was so important to medicine, why couldn’t her children afford health insurance?           Intimate in feeling, astonishing in scope, and impossible to put down, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks captures the beauty and drama of scientific discovery, as well as its human consequences.

    Détails sur le produit

    • Reliure : Hardcover
    • 384  pages
    • Dimensions :  3.8cmx15.7cmx23.6cm
    • Poids : 635.0g
    • Editeur :   Crown Paru le
    • ISBN :  1400052173
    • EAN13 :  9781400052172
    • Classe Dewey :  B
    • Langue : Anglais

    D'autres livres de Rebecca Skloot

    La Vie immortelle d'Henrietta Lacks

    Elle s’appelait Henrietta Lacks, mais les savants n’ont retenu de son nom que deux syllabes : HeLa. Elle travaillait dans les champs de tabac du Sud des États-Unis où besognaient ses ancêtres esclaves, mais ses cellules, prélevées à son insu, sont devenues l’un des outils les plus préci...

    La Vie immortelle d'Henrietta Lacks

    Elle s’appelait Henrietta Lacks, mais les savants n’ont retenu de son nom que deux syllabes : HeLa. Elle travaillait dans les champs de tabac du sud des Etats-Unis où besognaient ses ancêtres esclaves. Ses cellules, prélevées à son insu, sont devenues l’un des outils les plus précieux de...

    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    Amazon Best Books of the Month, February 2010: From a single, abbreviated life grew a seemingly immortal line of cells that made some of the most crucial innovations in modern science possible. And from that same life, and those cells, Rebecca Skloot has fashioned in The Immortal Life of Henrietta L...

    Voir tous les livres de Rebecca Skloot

    Commentaires sur cet article

    Personne n'a encore laissé de commentaire. Soyez le premier!

    Laisser un commentaire

    Rechercher des articles similaires par rayon

    Rechercher par thèmes associés

    Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. If you could pile all HeLa cells ever grown onto a scale, they’d weigh more than 50 million metric tons—as much as a hundred Empire State Buildings. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave.Now Rebecca Skloot takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the “colored” ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers full of HeLa cells; from Henrietta’s small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia—a land of wooden slave quarters, faith healings, and voodoo—to East Baltimore today, where her children and grandchildren live and struggle with the legacy of her cells. Henrietta’s family did not learn of her “immortality” until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists investigating HeLa began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. And though the cells had launched a multimillion-dollar industry that sells human biological materials, her family never saw any of the profits. As Rebecca Skloot so brilliantly shows, the story of the Lacks family—past and present—is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of. Over the decade it took to uncover this story, Rebecca became enmeshed in the lives of the Lacks family—especially Henrietta’s daughter Deborah, who was devastated to learn about her mother’s cells. She was consumed with questions: Had scientists cloned her mother? Did it hurt her when researchers infected her cells with viruses and shot them into space? What happened to her sister, Elsie, who died in a mental institution at the age of fifteen? And if her mother was so important to medicine, why couldn’t her children afford health insurance?           Intimate in feeling, astonishing in scope, and impossible to put down, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks captures the beauty and drama of scientific discovery, as well as its human consequences.